Biomass as raw material

All biomass, whether wood, grass, plants or straw, has three main components: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Each component has a significant market potential to replace fossil-based materials and products.

Cellulose brings strength to biomass. It can be identified, for example, by trying to pull the grass lengthwise, which requires quite a bit of force. Hemicellulose brings flexibility to biomass: in the wind, trees sway but need a strong storm to break. Lignin is the adhesive that holds the components together.

All these components, or fractions, have a role in the roadmap towards carbon neutrality and sustainable biomaterials. Currently, cellulose is the most utilized fraction for higher value applications, while hemicellulose and lignin are mainly burned for energy in biorefineries.

Bio2X uses fractionation technology, developed by Fortum's interest company Chempolis, that can extract not only cellulose but also hemicellulose and lignin for high-value products.

Read more about the fractionation technology

 

Straw is back in demand

Straw, such as wheat or rice straw, is abundantly available across the globe. After harvesting, it is usually discarded or even burned. However, as straw contains all three biomass fractions, it can be refined for high-value use.

Bio2X uses wheat straw as raw material while the grain is used for food, which allows for more efficient production on the same land area. The resulting fractions from the fractionation process have numerous applications globally, such as textiles, biocomposites, packaging materials, cosmetics and resins.

Currently there are virtually no advanced straw-based materials on the market. Straw fibres were used widely in the European paper industry until the 1950s, however, due to technical and financial issues arising from the refining processes, the production has almost completely disappeared.

Today, consumers are increasingly aware of sustainability issues and industries are under pressure to improve their sustainability performance. There is a strong pull in the market for straw-based applications, which are still extremely rare. Depending on the application, straw-based materials can be recyclable at their end of life.

Bale of straw

Multiple applications

Bio2X uses wheat straw as raw material while the grain is used for food, allowing for more efficient production on the same land area. The resulting fractions from the process has numerous applications globally, such as textiles, biocomposites, packaging materials, cosmetics and resins.

Read more about the products and solutions [LINKKI PRODUCTS AND SOLUTIONS -SIVULLE]

 

Chempolis plant

Technology to process straw

Currently there are virtually no advanced straw-based materials on the market. Straw fibres were used widely in the European paper industry until the 1950s, however, due to technical and financial issues arising from the refining processes, the production has almost completely disappeared.

The fractionation technology has overcome those challenges and can use up to 90% of straw for material production.

Read more about the technology [LINKKI TEKNOLOGIAAN]